NATIONAL AG NEWS SPONSORED BY THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU FEDERATION

National Ag News for July 5, 2022

EPA Revising Atrazine Registration

The National Corn Growers Association is concerned about a move by the Environmental Protection Agency that could restrict access to a critical crop protection tool. The EPA says it’s revising its registration for atrazine, a well-studied herbicide essential to farming. “We’re disappointed by this,” says NCGA President Chris Edgington. “We can feed and fuel the world and fight climate change, but we can’t do these things without modern farming tools, and atrazine is a critical tool for farming.” The new labeling requirements will impose difficult new restrictions and mitigation measures on the herbicide, limiting how much product farmers can use. The latest development marks a step backward in EPA’s commitment to transparency and using the best available science. However, Edgington says that EPA listened to growers’ requests and agreed to additional scientific review. NCGA will continue working with EPA through the entire process, which now enters a 60-day comment period.

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Applications Open for Young Leader Program

Young people passionate about agriculture and ready to become leaders are invited to apply for the next class in the ASA Corteva Agriscience Young Leader Program. The program is sponsored by the American Soybean Association and Corteva. It’s a two-phase educational program for actively farming individuals and couples passionate about agriculture. Phase 1 takes place November 29-December 1 in Johnston, Iowa, while Phase 2 is March 7-11, 2023, at Commodity Classic in Orlando, Florida. “As a member of the Class of 2009, I can tell you that this program is important and has had a real impact on not only the soybean industry but all of agriculture,” says ASA President Brad Doyle. Individual soybean growers and couples are encouraged to apply for the program, which focuses on leadership and communication, agriculture trends and information, and developing a strong and connected network. For more information, growers can go to soygrowers.com.

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Wheat Growers List 2023 Farm Bill Priorities

The National Association of Wheat Growers shared their priorities for the 2023 Farm Bill. As lawmakers continue putting the next farm bill together, wheat growers will be advocating for these priorities on Capitol Hill. The priorities include protecting crop insurance to ensure growers have a strong and reliable safety net assists wheat growers when it’s needed during disasters. They also want to support financial and technical assistance provided through voluntary conservation programs. The wheat growers want an increase in the reference price for wheat in Title 1 to help cover the cost of production more accurately. They also favor enhancing USDA’s market access and development programs to enhance trade. “The farm bill addresses many programs that are critical for wheat growers, and we look forward to actively engaging in the farm bill reauthorization process,” says NAWG President Nicole Berg. “Sharing our priorities is the first step in the reauthorization process.”

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NMPF: Prioritize Food Access at Hunger Conference

The National Milk Producers Federation led eleven national agriculture, anti-hunger, nutrition, and medical groups in a virtual listening session with the White House on food access. The White House is holding its Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health in September, and the groups want officials to place a high priority on accessing affordable, diverse, and nutritious foods. The NMPF organized the session to offer the White House expertise and real-world experience from a wide range of organizations on how important increased access to food and a diverse range of food choices are to fight nutrition insecurity and improve nutrition-related health. The event is part of the broader effort to provide input to the White House as officials put together a new strategy to end hunger and increase healthy eating and physical activity among Americans by 2030. Officials say the White House plans to release its new strategy during the September conference.

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Nominations Open for Farm Dog of the Year Contest

Farmers are invited to submit their nominations for the 2023 Farm Bureau Farm Dog of the Year contest, which is co-sponsored by Purina. It’s the fifth annual contest, which celebrates farm dogs and the many ways they support farmers and ranchers in producing nutritious food for families and their pets across America. The nomination deadline has been extended to July 15. The grand prize winner will get a year’s worth of Purina dog food and $5,000 in prize money. The winner also gets recognized during an award ceremony at the American Farm Bureau Federation Convention in January 2023. Up for four regional runners-up will each win $1,000 in prize money. The 2023 Farm Dog of the Year will also get featured in a professionally-produced video. Farm dog owners must be members of the Farm Bureau to enter their dogs in the competition. For more information, prospective contest entrants can go to fb.org.

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Bill Would Keep U.S. Ag from Exploitation

New York Representative Elise Stefanik and other House Republicans introduced legislation that would prevent adversarial countries from acquiring American companies amid global food shortages. Stefanik says food security is national security, and she’s proud to stand against our foreign adversaries as they attempt to exploit potential vulnerabilities and assert control over America’s agricultural industry. The bill would specifically prevent countries like China, Russia, Iran, and North Korea from being allowed to buy American agricultural companies, citing them as “prohibited.” It also lists biotechnology and agriculture as critical infrastructure. “Adversarial nations like China continue to threaten our homeland, using tactics like buying American agriculture companies and stealing agricultural research to undermine our economy,” Stefanik says. Fox News says the food security issue is a global problem because of the war in Ukraine, which has led to global food shortages. Republicans say Russia is using food manipulation as a weapon in its invasion of Ukraine.

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By Tucker Allmer - The BARN

Tucker Allmer & the BARN are members of the National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB), the Colorado FFA Foundation, the Colorado 4H Foundation, the Colorado Farm Show Marketing Committee, 1867 Club Board Member, Denver Ag & Livestock Club Member, the Weld County Fair Board, the Briggsdale FFA Advisory Council, Briggsdale 4H Club Beef Leader & Founder / Coordinator of the Briggsdale Classic Open Jackpot Show.